Francis Vachon Photographe

August 31, 2008

Pat Retro

It was recently the Celine Dion’s show on the Plains of Abraham for the 400th anniversary of Quebec city. In many interviews, she mentioned her special relationship since 20 year now with the restaurant Pat Retro and their famous “Pain à la viande”. Before the show, they had 40 or something of them delivered for their crew.

So the La Semaine magazine sent me there to photograph in detail the place, some of the item on the menu, and particularly the pain à la viande.

Pat Retro
Interior of Pat Retro’s restaurant
Technical: Canon EOS 20D, 1/80 at f3,5 with a 24-70 at 54mm – ISO 400, two remote flash aimed at the ceiling to pimp the ambient light.

 

Le Michigan du resto Pat Retro
Pat Retro’s Michigan
Technical: see below

 

assiette Caruso
Pat Retro’s assiette Caruso
Technical: see below

 

Pat Retro
Pat Retro’s Piment Fort burger
Technical: see below

 

Pat Retro
Pat Retro’s poutine italienne (I had to taste it. I must say that this is a real and serious contender for Ashton’s poutine. It is THAT good.
Technical: see below

 

Pain a la viande de chez Pat Retro
Pat Retro’s famous Pain à la viande, beloved by Celine Dion and René Angelil.
Technical: see below

All food where shot with the same setting. I used my 20d (my Mark II was about to be sent to repair, and my Mark III was not arrived yet) with a 24-70. Why this lens? For food, you usually want to get real close, almost like a macro shot. The 24-70 has a very short minimum focus point, allowing me to get real close and personal.

The food was put inside a light tent to diffuse the light coming from the two flashes. This allowed me to shoot at 1/250 (to kill the ambient light) at f18
Here was the setup:

food shot setup

Are you ready for some football?

I covered some High school football yesterday. It was my first sport assignment with my Mark III. And now one thing is for sure: the dreaded autofocus issue does not affect mine. It worked flawlessly, with only a handful of out-of-focus photos – far less than what I had with my Mark II.

All photos shot with it my Mark III, a 300mm and on Aperture priority mode at f4.

psq-foot-01.jpg

psq-foot-02.jpg

psq-foot-03.jpg

August 29, 2008

Camera bag

As a photographer AND father, I can relate :)

Source: What the Duck

August 27, 2008

Pictures soon

Not a lot of pictures posted here recently, right? It’s just because I worked mainly for magazine for the last 2 weeks. This Friday, with the new edition of La Semaine, I should be able to post 3 assignments I did for them

August 20, 2008

How much should you charge?

So you are following my blog for a while now. So you read me about microstock, about standing you ground when it comes to negotiate. And now you want to start charging a fair price too. So where do you start? How much do you charge? How much is a fair price?

It all depends of the usage the client wants.

You see, you don’t actually sell a photo. You sell a license to use a photo. That’s pretty different, and it is pretty important because you can resell the same photo over and over again to different clients. Or even to the same client when the license is expired.

The standard for stock pricing is fotoquote, from Cradoc fotosoftware. From a series of drop down menus, you tell the software the usage your client wants, and it tells you back the price you should charge.

For instance, If a company wanted to buy me a picture for the front page of their annual report, up to 10000 copies in Canada, the price would be 1300$

A 1/4 of a page editorial use in a consumer magazine that sells up to 100000 copies would fetch 300$ for the same image. Slightly more that what Time magazine paid recently for their cover

Still the same photo, but this time for advertisement on a billboard , more than a hundred of them, for a 3 months campaign? That would get me 2800$

And if the same client would also use the image in a magazine advertisement, that would be on top of what he paid for the billboards.

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